Blog

By Whitney Nelson 16 Mar, 2017

Written By: Christina Frazier, PhD

Working with outstanding professionals is a privilege. Training professionals who are seeking ways to be outstanding is the greatest privilege. Imagine . You can see the desire, energy and motivation to learn something new in their expressions. You can hear their statements turn into questions merely due to their efforts to try. You can witness confidence exploding inside them as they demonstrate proficiency of new knowledge. You can gain a sense of gratitude by being present in the moments of learning. Training adult professionals is a privilege and my hope is for you (company leaders, HR professionals, frontline employees) to work with outstanding people.

At all levels of an organization, supporting advanced ways of doing a task, process, or system requires various pedogies for the acquisition of knowledge to occur. I have the privilege to support adults to learn new information who are participants on corporate boards, executive leaders, frontline workers and those not employed. Acquiring new skills makes organizations more efficient, competitive and productive in a healthy work environment.

An Observation

When I present ideas for training solutions and share employee needs, professionals hesitate. Their typical reaction is a perceived cost of training  services even though the human productivity outcomes outweigh the costs . Some professionals make the following assumptions about their workforce: ( a) all employees are self-trainable, ( b) the assigned department will address the needed skill sets  and  have time to do so), or ( c) assuming adequate training is already in the plan for new ways of performing a task, process, or system. The following experiences are common situations as well:

  • Professionals are typically troubled to know that there are many minimally trained adults working for their company.
  • Professionals are further alarmed to learn about an untrained (e.g., technology, skilled labor, etc.) adult population eager to be part of today's workforce.

From my experiences, the previous situations are common. The use of technologies (i.e., tablets and laptops) are becoming more intertwined into business processes, such as reporting hours to HR in SAP software while out in the field. Knowing how to learn  is a common challenge for untrained or employees unreceptive to new practices based on past educational experiences and environment. In companies, barrier exist to training a workforce:

  • Minimal monies are available or allocated to training.
  • Training departments have decreased budget allocations and an increase demand to respond to new processes and systems, state and federal training mandates, and or new software deployments.
  • IT departments are being required to perform training responsibilities even though they are typically inadequate prepared to do so and  required to continue to manage daily IT operations.
  • Employees with significant training needs may not be reached or approached for training based on the company's mode to gather inquires or strategic direction of job performance requirements.

Professionals are, therefore, asking more technological or skill based requirements of their employees and, yet, may be are unaware of the scope of training needs. Thus, these situations may be a determinant of productivity, innovation and efficiency of their employees in the future. New ways of doing our work is changing and making no assumptions on employee groups' skill sets is necessary to continue ongoing productivity, generation of new ideas and a healthy work environment.

Solutions

Solutions exist to support companies seeking a skilled, efficient, productive, forward thinking and healthy workforce. Below are a few resources for consideration:

  1. Personalization via online instruction or instructor-led. Learning requires real-time feedback by the instructor to modify to the learners distinctive pace, style and experiences. An example of personalizing learning is for the instructor to determine the learner's past experiences and learning goals. Companies should consider breaking traditional learning methods by introducing aspects of personalizing the learning environment to build overall confidence, engagement and expertise in their workforce.
  2. Align with company's strategies. Alignment drives direction and highlights employee training needs to advance toward results. Any initiative, program or technology investment should involve input from business leaders to ensure that learning is driving retention, engagement, and performance.
  3. Use social media. Social media provides multiple sources of learning resources for consideration and reaches mixed generations. It provides uses for collaboration and fostering a culture of learning.  
  4. Measure effectiveness .  Determine if you learning strategy is driving strategic outcomes by measuring its effectiveness. Know what result you are seeking, such as proficiency of a new skill or knowledge, decreased absenteeism and increased productivity, or employee engagement and satisfaction. Determine what you are measuring to support your delivery method, content, and assessment.  
  5. Collaborate. Find the right provider to deliver the training and collaborate with other business leaders. Training needs may be broader than a single department or employee group. The provider should be able to develop rapport, be flexible and adaptable, and balance employee engagement and empowerment with the company's training goals.

Each adult learner brings opportunities for me to learn and expand my understanding of diverse views, my humbleness, and how to better my professional 'self'. Seeing, hearing, and being witness to an adult learning a new skill is the greatest privilege. There is nothing more rewarding than to see a professional become elated by using a tablet for the first time, practicing a shortcut, and sharing what they learned to a co-worker. Recently I witnessed a professional search the Internet for the first time. Imagine . Training professionals is the greatest privilege.

 

Resources: https://elearningindustry.com/learning-and-development-trends-practices-watch-2016 ; https://trainingmag.com/5-trends-future-learning-and-development ; http://mfeldstein.com/faculty-know-adaptive-learning/


By Whitney Nelson 16 Mar, 2017

Written By: Christina Frazier, PhD

Working with outstanding professionals is a privilege. Training professionals who are seeking ways to be outstanding is the greatest privilege. Imagine . You can see the desire, energy and motivation to learn something new in their expressions. You can hear their statements turn into questions merely due to their efforts to try. You can witness confidence exploding inside them as they demonstrate proficiency of new knowledge. You can gain a sense of gratitude by being present in the moments of learning. Training adult professionals is a privilege and my hope is for you (company leaders, HR professionals, frontline employees) to work with outstanding people.

At all levels of an organization, supporting advanced ways of doing a task, process, or system requires various pedogies for the acquisition of knowledge to occur. I have the privilege to support adults to learn new information who are participants on corporate boards, executive leaders, frontline workers and those not employed. Acquiring new skills makes organizations more efficient, competitive and productive in a healthy work environment.

An Observation

When I present ideas for training solutions and share employee needs, professionals hesitate. Their typical reaction is a perceived cost of training  services even though the human productivity outcomes outweigh the costs . Some professionals make the following assumptions about their workforce: ( a) all employees are self-trainable, ( b) the assigned department will address the needed skill sets  and  have time to do so), or ( c) assuming adequate training is already in the plan for new ways of performing a task, process, or system. The following experiences are common situations as well:

  • Professionals are typically troubled to know that there are many minimally trained adults working for their company.
  • Professionals are further alarmed to learn about an untrained (e.g., technology, skilled labor, etc.) adult population eager to be part of today's workforce.

From my experiences, the previous situations are common. The use of technologies (i.e., tablets and laptops) are becoming more intertwined into business processes, such as reporting hours to HR in SAP software while out in the field. Knowing how to learn  is a common challenge for untrained or employees unreceptive to new practices based on past educational experiences and environment. In companies, barrier exist to training a workforce:

  • Minimal monies are available or allocated to training.
  • Training departments have decreased budget allocations and an increase demand to respond to new processes and systems, state and federal training mandates, and or new software deployments.
  • IT departments are being required to perform training responsibilities even though they are typically inadequate prepared to do so and  required to continue to manage daily IT operations.
  • Employees with significant training needs may not be reached or approached for training based on the company's mode to gather inquires or strategic direction of job performance requirements.

Professionals are, therefore, asking more technological or skill based requirements of their employees and, yet, may be are unaware of the scope of training needs. Thus, these situations may be a determinant of productivity, innovation and efficiency of their employees in the future. New ways of doing our work is changing and making no assumptions on employee groups' skill sets is necessary to continue ongoing productivity, generation of new ideas and a healthy work environment.

Solutions

Solutions exist to support companies seeking a skilled, efficient, productive, forward thinking and healthy workforce. Below are a few resources for consideration:

  1. Personalization via online instruction or instructor-led. Learning requires real-time feedback by the instructor to modify to the learners distinctive pace, style and experiences. An example of personalizing learning is for the instructor to determine the learner's past experiences and learning goals. Companies should consider breaking traditional learning methods by introducing aspects of personalizing the learning environment to build overall confidence, engagement and expertise in their workforce.
  2. Align with company's strategies. Alignment drives direction and highlights employee training needs to advance toward results. Any initiative, program or technology investment should involve input from business leaders to ensure that learning is driving retention, engagement, and performance.
  3. Use social media. Social media provides multiple sources of learning resources for consideration and reaches mixed generations. It provides uses for collaboration and fostering a culture of learning.  
  4. Measure effectiveness .  Determine if you learning strategy is driving strategic outcomes by measuring its effectiveness. Know what result you are seeking, such as proficiency of a new skill or knowledge, decreased absenteeism and increased productivity, or employee engagement and satisfaction. Determine what you are measuring to support your delivery method, content, and assessment.  
  5. Collaborate. Find the right provider to deliver the training and collaborate with other business leaders. Training needs may be broader than a single department or employee group. The provider should be able to develop rapport, be flexible and adaptable, and balance employee engagement and empowerment with the company's training goals.

Each adult learner brings opportunities for me to learn and expand my understanding of diverse views, my humbleness, and how to better my professional 'self'. Seeing, hearing, and being witness to an adult learning a new skill is the greatest privilege. There is nothing more rewarding than to see a professional become elated by using a tablet for the first time, practicing a shortcut, and sharing what they learned to a co-worker. Recently I witnessed a professional search the Internet for the first time. Imagine . Training professionals is the greatest privilege.

 

Resources: https://elearningindustry.com/learning-and-development-trends-practices-watch-2016 ; https://trainingmag.com/5-trends-future-learning-and-development ; http://mfeldstein.com/faculty-know-adaptive-learning/


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